Take the Helmet…

Okay… we had some fun today!  So let me share! From Ephesians 6 (which we memorized last year in Foundations), we pulled a verse and analyzed it (most of it anyway ). Here is the verse… Take the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God. Do you see the purpose? Imperative.  Which means the subject is what? Implied ‘you’.  The verb? Take. (should be capitalized in the diagram below :))Do you see the preposition used?  Of.   Do you see the different noun cases/roles? Direct object and object of the preposition. Do you see the dual or compound direct object?  Helmet and sword.   Do you see the coordinating conjunction ‘and’ (which we are going to touch on more in week 6)? Note: Today, we left the dependent adjectival clause (who/which clause) alone.  Here is our board setup for this sentence… I enjoyed choosing to focus on prepositions this week… as we are working with prepositional openers in our US History-Based IEW writing. $$$  You DO KNOW that you can get a 4′ x8′ show tile (shown above) from Lowe’s Home Improvement stores for about $15…  It is our official white board.  $$$ Have fun with words and sentence...

Week 5 – Informative Interrogatives

Who?   What?   Where?   When?   Why?   How? Interrogatives, in the gentler sense of the word, have to be my favorite sentence purpose.  Interrogatives (questions) are the bedrock upon which relationships are formed and eventually mature.  Through the use of interrogatives you uncover the priorities, values, heart and mind of another person (and many times yourself).  How are you?  What is your favorite ________? Are you all right?  Is there anything I can do?  What would you do if __________? Do you know _______? Do you like ________? Have you ever _______? May I help? Questions like these, enable us learn about the one of whom we are asking the questions.  In my mind, when a person uses questions like these it reveals an other-centeredness.  Someone that cares about hearing others and not just being heard.  Ahhh… good communication is key for healthy, strong relationships, isn’t it?!? Do you understand? Jesus masterfully used interrogatives to reveal the understanding, motives and heart of others, especially the religious leaders.  I find the use of interrogatives in order to check understanding most fascinating!  Jesus had a disarming yet authoritative way of weaving interrogatives into his teaching to keep the student/person engaged and their mind actively focused.  Here are some examples from the Sermon on the Mount (Matt 5-7): You are the salt of the earth; but if the salt has become tasteless, how will it be made salty again? For if you love those who love you, what reward have you? Do not even the tax-gathers do the same? Look at the birds… Are you not worth much more than they?… Why are you...

Our Trip to Jamestown

We’re back!  From Great Wolf Lodge (GWL) in Williamsburg, VA to touring Jamestown – the Shirley family had a wonderful trip! If you haven’t heard about Classical Conversations annual GWL in Williamburg Deal every September, you are missing out!  Loads of family fun at 1/3 of the price! It is during Williamsburg’s homeschool week, which is usually around the 2nd full week of September!  We see other CC friends and home schoolers from across the nation! Due to the fun I was having a the GWL water park – I have no pictures of our time at the water park.  However, Jamestown is a different story!  I mean Jamestown was fun too, but I actually have pictures :). Jamestown is the first permanent English settlement in the new world. It was founded in...

Week 4 – Imperatives! Diagramming? Phonograms!

Another wonderful day of discovery and learning!  As we uncover more purposes and analytical tasks, students are enjoying the challenge. Imperatives This week we turn our attention to a new and unique purpose, imperatives.  Imperatives are commands.  They may have a noun of direct address, but always contain the hidden implied you.  Imperatives are always in 2nd person – as you are talking to a person and the verb is always in present tense. Refer to your field guide (EEL Guide) week 4 for more about imperatives. Sentence Shuffle (by purpose) Taking some sentences from this week’s EEL editing exercise (p 59), we transformed a few declarative and interrogative sentences into imperative sentences.  Pharisees questioned him.    —>    Question him. I also made the sentences from this week’s Teacher Sheets into declarative sentences, and then had the students turned them into imperatives.  I wept tearfully.      —>        Weep.    or   Weep tearfully. We discussed the implied you and the verb tense change (if any).  This simple exercise produced some wonderful dialogue as we unearthed more language concepts and applied the concept utilizing our trusty tools (EEL tasks). Diagramming Let’s make a picture of that sentence!  Diagramming helps us analyze the structure of a sentence and the role of each word, phrase and clause.  In my own children’s writings if we encounter a sentence that seems unclear, I will have them stop and diagram it.  This helps the student to really examine what they are trying to say and the best way to say it. Students should already be working on page B7/C7.  Students should be copying this page at first, then...

Week 3 – On Location with Nouns and Pronouns

This week we have yet another discovery to dig into… Pull out your trusty field guide (EEL Guide) and review week 3’s lesson information. (Still trying to figure out your field guide? Help is here!) This week is loaded with all sorts of information concerning nouns and pronouns and the central roles they play in sentences.  Orderly Connections! In English, the location of a noun  in relationship to other words in a sentence dictates that noun’s role (subject, direct object, indirect object, possessive, and object of the preposition).  In Latin, it is not the location of the noun but rather the noun ending that tells you the role the noun is playing in a sentence. Therefore in Latin sentences words can be in any order! Week 3 also introduces EEL Analytical Task 3.  If this is your first time to look at this information , allow yourself to digest small pieces of information at a time.  We will be reviewing and discussing nouns and pronouns for several weeks, so be patient with yourself.  Refer to page A3 and A36 to see an overview schedule for the year – keep this framework in mind, there is a lot of review built in. Remember EEL Task 1 is simply loading the grammar.  Putting in the data, vocabulary, lists, etc… into the brain for later retrieval and application.  EEL Task 1 points you to Appendices B and C for our grammar.  This week add the student mastery charts on nouns and pronouns from Appendix C to your student’s studies and weekly memory work.  Have your own laser printer at home? Want to...